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Writer

Geoff Poulter

Show BioHide BioGEOFFREY POULTER, 69, has spent 50 years in the sports media. He retired from newspapers nine years ago but has stayed involved for the past decade on SEN sports radio programs on Wednesday nights. He is best remembered as Melbourne Herald chief football writer, 1987-90. We asked Poults to describe himself in just a few words. His response - sports oracle, author, historian, philosopher, impersonator, raconteur, poet, singer/song-writer, quiz whiz, intellectual scholar, And a couple of steps ahead of the rest!

20 posts

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Bradman tops the tops

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GEOFF POULTER has tackled the impossible: naming the 10 greatest Australians in any field. And the winner is: ON the eve of another Ashes series it is again time to acknowledge our greatest Australian, in any field – Sir Donald George Bradman (1908-2001). Big ... More »

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Weight can wear down a Cup star

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GEOFF POULTER laments his lack of winners in the Cup and says it’s often down to weights. But he’s managed to compose himself and compose a Canberra report from the 2017 Cup runners More »

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Winners and losers on the punt

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GEOFF POULTER has spent a little time on assignment assessing the form of the punters in your local TAB: PREPARE for a variety of different dudes you will come across at your local TAB during the Spring racing carnival. I call them The Top 10 Typical TAB Types... More »

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The days of grim grand finals

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PLAYING footy during the Depression was a way of getting food for the family. GEOFF POULTER recalls when times were so tough that losing a semi-final could be a bonus. More »

Albert Collier
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Looking up to a Magpie Brownlow Medallist

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THERE WAS NO red carpet or WAGs, no ceremony, no fuss, when the Brownlow was handed out in the old days. GEOFF POULTER recounts some of the odd quirks in the history of football’s famous medal: ALBERT COLLIER was painting the battleship grey Herald building in... More »

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Call that FOOTball?

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IN THE OLD DAYS, it was recorded as a “pass to comrade” and used only in desperation. Today, HANDball is taking over the great game of Australian Rules FOOTball, as GEOFF POULTER points out: More »